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Notes of [The Elements of Style] by Strunk and White, Part I(a)

  1. For date and time, punctuate as follows:
    • February to July, 1972
    • April 18, 2011
    • Wednesday, November 13, 1929
  2. The abbreviations etc., i.e., and e.g., the abbreviations for academic degrees, and titles that follow a name are parenthetic and should be punctuated accordingly:
    • Letters, packages, etc., should go here
    • Previous work, e.g., Mark’s [2] and Strunk’s [4]…
    • The other people, i.e., those that …
    • Horace Fulsome, Ph.D., presided
    • Rachel Simonds, Attorney
    • The Reverend Harry Lang, S.J.
  3. Clauses introduced by which, when and where are nonrestrictive; they do not limit or define, they merely add something.
  4. Place a comma before a conjunction introducing an independent clause.
    • The early records of the city have disappeared, and the story of its first years can no longer be reconstructed;
    • The situation is perilous, but here is still one chance of escape.
  5. Two-part sentences of which the second member is introduced by as (‘because’), for, or, nor, or while (‘and at the same time’) likewise require a comma before the conjunction.
  6. If two or more clauses grammatically complete and not joined by a conjunction are to form a single compound sentence, the proper mark of punctuation is a semicolon.
  7. Note the use of semicolon is needed for the case where the second clause is preceded by an adverb (e.g., accordingly, besides, then, therefore, thus, etc.), but not a conjunction.
    • It is nearly half past five, and our car is almost broken.
    • It is nearly half past five; besides, our car is almost broken.
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Discussion

One thought on “Notes of [The Elements of Style] by Strunk and White, Part I(a)

  1. Good, I’m also reading it.

    Posted by ratehk | April 18, 2011, 5:00 pm

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